Estonian Fauna - Bat

In stock: 0 pcs
Reference:
4740352113978
Issue Date: 14.02.2008
Designer: Sándor Stern
Number: 397-14.02.08
Stamp zone: Other stamps
Stamp type: Classical
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0.35 €
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Description

Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.Bats are the only mammals actually able to fly using their wings that connect the digits, the body, the hind limbs and the tail. Twelve species of bats have been registered in Estonia. Estonian bats are insectivores and use ultrasound and echolocation to find food in darkness. The species illustrated in the stamp is the brown long-eared bat (Plecotus auritus), which has excessively large ears. In the summer it finds shelter in wall cracks or hollow trees and in the winter in cellars. It mainly feeds on moths, which it can grab from flight but also from tree-leaves. The brown long-eared bat only has one offspring a year. The bat population has declined in the recent years due to the contracting number of suitable shelters and disturbance at their nursery roosts or their winter hibernicula, therefore all Estonian bats are protected.

Product Details
4740352113978

Data sheet

Quantity issued:
180000
Perforation:
12¾ x 13
Printer:
AS Vaba Maa
Print:
offset
Sheets:
4 x 5
Size:
40.88 x 41.3 mm
Primary theme:
fauna/flora
Year:
2008

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